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WHERE TO STOCKPILE KI?
Distance from Reactor Site - What the Experts Say

 

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission:

NRC’s NUREG-1623 points out that radioactive iodide can travel hundreds of miles on the winds. An increase in cancer caused by Chernobyl,was detected in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine. Notably, this increase, seen in areas more that 150 miles from the site, continues to this day and primarily affects children who were 0-14 years old at the time of the accident…the vast majority of the thyroid cancers were diagnosed among those living more than 31 miles from the site.

The 2001 figures showed 11,000 thyroid cancers at 31 miles.

NRC's NUREG/CR 1433 said that for children, the following dangers might occur from the inhalation of nuclear materials after a massive core-melt atmospheric accident (like Chernobyl).

 

Approximate Dangers of a Core-Melt Atmospheric Accident for Children 

PRIVATEDistance in Miles

Mean Thyroid Dose
(rem) for Exposed
Children Outdoors*

Probability of Thyroid Damage to Exposed Children Located Outdoors if not Protected by Stable Iodine (like KI)

1

26,000

100%

5

11,600

100%

10

6,400

100%

25

2,200

80%

50

760

26%

100

200

7%

150

72

2%

200

32

1%

 

World Health Organization:

The recently updated (1999) World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines for Iodine Prophylaxis following Nuclear Accidents states in its abstract regarding thyroid cancer caused by the Chernobyl disaster:

This increase in incidence has been documented up to 500 km from the accident site.

...And therefore... That stockpiling (KI or KIO3) is warranted, when feasible, over much wider areas than normally encompassed by emergency planning zones, and that the opportunity for voluntary purchase be part of national plans.

The World Health Organization says further that stockpiles of KI should be kept locally in schools, hospitals, fire stations, and the like.

 

Where to Stockpile at Home and in the Community

KI should be on-hand in…

Home/Personal Use: KI should be kept in your medicine cabinet; car glove box; and recreational vehicle – boat, motor home.

Schools/Pre-Schools/ Day Care Centers: Even if you have KI in your home, it will not do your children any good if an accident occurs during school hours. Children are the most vulnerable population.

Shelters: In a nuclear disaster, the protective action will be “shelter” or “evacuate.” If the call is to shelter and you are either a visitor to town or a resident of town, but not near to your home when the alarm sounds, you should go immediately to a public shelter. There, you should be offered KI. Minors, unaccompanied by a parent or guardian, should be given KI if their parent/guardian has a signed permission on record with the town.

Institutions: correctional facilities; hospitals; nursing homes; residential homes.

Reception Centers & Mass Care Facilities: In a nuclear disaster Reception Centers and Mass Care Facilities have been set up outside the 10-mile EPZ to assist evacuees from the EPZ communities.

 

More about KI

More about Emergency Planning

 

 

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